The Dunwoody Nature Center welcomes nearly 25,000 visitors annually to its grounds, which include Wildcat Creek, the wetlands boardwalk, public treehouse and multiple gardens. Encompassing Dunwoody Park, the Dunwoody Nature Center uses its native surroundings to educate children and adults of all ages about the natural world and one’s place in the environment.

Closed Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

Founded in 1889, Zoo Atlanta is one of the 10 oldest zoos in continuous operation in the United States. Bring your family today to enjoy this historical site and the Zoo’s family-friendly daily activities.

Animal Feedings give a whole new meaning to the word “hungry” and give the family a close-up view of giraffes, orangutans, gorillas and tigers.

“Animal Superstars” and “Awesome Animals” are interactive wildlife shows performed every day (except Tuesday) and demonstrate how the Zoo’s trainers work with different animals.

Georgia Natural Gas Blue Flame Express Train is a handcrafted replica of an original 1863 locomotive that takes kids on an exciting tour of the Zoo.

Rock Climber lets kids test their skills against the clock and their friends to see how fast they can climb up a 24-foot rock wall.

Nabisco Endangered Species Carousel takes kids for a whimsical spin on 38 hand-carved wooden animal figures.

Petting Zoo is the place to see the Boer goats, the Kunekune pigs and more! Open daily from 10 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Robert Clements, 2010
Sculpture
Ceramic tiles, paint

Artist Robert Clements enlisted students from Atlanta’s Peyton Forest Elementary School (adjacent to Isabel Gates Park) to design and paint 250 of the sculpture’s ceramic tiles. “Working with the children from Peyton Forest Elementary School on this project commissioned by the Office of Cultural Affairs to chronicle a woman not only important in her community but the nation as a whole was a privilege. My goal was to capture the story of Isabel Gates Webster and what she stood for so that her community could forever embrace her legacy,” said Clements.

Various artists, ongoing
Visual projection
Georgia State University

The Window Project is a new media, public art platform located in downtown Atlanta on the southern end of Woodruff park. Projecting 80 feet across the windows of Georgia State University’s Digital Arts Entertainment Lab, curated programming screens from sundown to sunrise every day and is changed out once a month.

Eleanor Hand, 1995
Sculpture
Wood, painted steel, concrete
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This piece features four metal cut-out figures represent a family of two parents and two children. They hold hands around a central pole, which serves as the base for an umbrella structure. The umbrella is 14 ft tall and 21 ft wide. This piece was created on collaboration with youth in the Capitol Area Mosaic Teen Program. Residents in the community were invited to participate in selection of the design.

Steven Weitzman, 2013
Sidewalk mural
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Maryland based artist Steven Weitzman’s public art leads passers-by on a walk through the West End community’s history. The sidewalk artwalk, constructed of full-color FOTERA structural concrete murals and specialty pavers, is on the north sidewalk on Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard between Lee and Lowery Streets. Stretching nearly the length of two football fields, the artwalk tells the story of the West End community, highlighting landmarks and historical points of interest.

Ralph Helmick, 1996
Silicon bronze
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This monument pays tribute to civil right leader John Wesley Dobbs, who was a Grand Master of the Prince Hall Masonic Lodge of Georgia, a leader in voter registration and political thought, and a famous orator who coined the phrase “Sweet Auburn.” The portrait mask depicting Dobbs is inspired by the 12th century Nigerian life-sculpture tradition, and it includes text and quotes inscribed on the interior of the mask, from where Auburn Avenue can be literally viewed “through his eyes.” Ralph Helmick, a formally trained sculptor, was selected through CODA’s nationwide Call for Artists Initiative, and he installed this piece for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics.

Elena Laveron, 1969
Sculpture
Fiberglass, granite aggregate
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This is an abstract sculpture of a family made of fiberglass with synthetic concrete surfacing. This work was inspired by Henry Moore, a renowned English abstract sculptor. The artist, Elena Laveron, is a Spanish artist who studied painting, drawing and sculpture in Spain and France.

John Riddle, 1976
Sculpture
Reinforced concrete
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This abstract sculpture is made with square concrete columns. The main column is adorned with symbolic designs of the Adrinka printing stamps. These designs are from the West African region of Ghana and include a moon, a musical instrument, a gear shape, and other abstract designs. The sculpture includes a bench. Its inscription reads, “Spirit Bench. Think the best. God will do the rest.”

Ayokunle Odeleye, 1996
Sculpture
Stainless steel, mild steel
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This sculpture functions as a working sundial and light fixture, and it includes design elements that honor individuals of the Cascade Road community who have had significant impacts on Atlanta and beyond through scholarship and creativity.

Wayne Trapp, 2004
Sculpture
Stainless steel with powder coat
MARTA

American artist Wayne Trapp created this sculpture at the Lindbergh MARTA station as a whimsical abstraction on the themes of transportation and travel.

Spencer Murrill, 2013
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

The intention of “Spatial Tension Mural” is to move and progress as users of the Atlanta BeltLine Eastside Trail move alongside it. The mural was designed to appeal to children and adults and seeks to welcome and excite people exploring the Atlanta BeltLine.

Unknown artist
Architecture
Metal

Now located in Atlantic Station’s Foundry Park, this metal piece is one of the original smokestacks from the Atlantic Steel mill that was initially located on this land prior to the development of Atlantic Station.

Unknown artist, 2007
Mural
Silhouette Midtown

The Silhouette Midtown is aptly decorated with bold urban silhouettes on the front and side of the 10-story structure.

Arturo Lindsay, 2003
Architecture
Painted aluminum, bronze
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Decorative exterior railings and medallions on the Municipal Courthouse feature Yoruba symbols of eyes and lightning bolts, which represent the overseeing of crossroads and justice respectively. Courthouses are essentially crossroads – public places where issues of social justice are adjudicated and where fundamental changes dramatically altering the future direction of people’s lives can occur. In response, Arturo Lindsay has drawn upon the mythology of the Yoruba, a West African civilization that has contributed greatly to the cultural traditions of the United States and all of the Americas. Two Yoruba deities known as “orishas” speak to the courthouse’s purpose and daily activities; Orisha Eshu-Elegba, the guardian of crossroads, and Shango, the orisha in charge of social justice, are both referenced in the designs.

Auguste Rodin (cast), 1880 (original)
Bronze
Sculpture
High Museum of Art

This cast of the Auguste Rodin sculpture piece, called “The Shade,” was donated to the High Museum by the French government in memory of victims of a plane crash during a museum-sponsored trip to Paris, France, in 1962.

Gordon Chandler, 2001
Sculpture
Steel
Fulton County Public Art Program

Enlaced with bright colors and whimsical designs, Sandtown Park Archway introduces the park to the public as an engaging place to visit. The colorful, geometric forms soaring across the galvanized steel arch are modeled after carnival and amusement park ride images, thereby providing a portal to a place of fun.

Daniel Chester French, 1909
Sculpture
Bronze, marble
Southern Railway

This historic bronze sculpture by renowned American sculptor Daniel Chester French is a memorial to Samuel Spencer, Southern Railway’s first president, and is considered to be the prototype for the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Commissioned in 1909 by Southern Railway employees, the sculpture and its ornate granite base by Henry Bacon were originally located at Atlanta’s downtown passenger train station. After the terminal was demolished in 1972, the sculpture was rededicated on July 3, 1970 at Brookwood Station. It was relocated again in 1996 by CODA, and then again in 2009 to Midtown.

Daniel Chester French, 1909
Sculpture
Bronze, marble
Southern Railway

This historic bronze sculpture by renowned American sculptor Daniel Chester French is a memorial to Samuel Spencer, Southern Railway’s first president, and is considered to be the prototype for the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Commissioned in 1909 by Southern Railway employees, the sculpture and its ornate granite base by Henry Bacon were originally located at Atlanta’s downtown passenger train station. After the terminal was demolished in 1972, the sculpture was rededicated on July 3, 1970 at Brookwood Station. It was relocated again in 1996 by CODA, and then again in 2009 to Midtown.

Dorothy Berge, 1968
Sculpture
Bronze

This statue was commissioned in 1968 for the Colony Square block. It was moved in the 1990s but was replaced in a prominent location near the corner of 10th and Peachtree Streets in 2014.

Zachary Coffin, 2013
Sculpture
Rock
Midtown Alliance

Atlanta native Zachary Coffin’s 22,000-pound boulder from the Black Rock Desert of northern Nevada is located on the corner of 10th and Peachtree Streets. The kinetic art is mounted on a bearing that allows park visitors and passers-by to slowly turn it around. Coffin has pieces across the U.S. and in Switzerland.

Nobuhito M. Matoba, 1995
Sculpture
Bronze
The Woodruff Arts Center

American artist Nobuhito M. Matoba was born in Japan in 1936 and died in the Atlanta area in 1998. Matoba was known for his bronze sculptures of U.S. presidents and industry leaders. This sculpture is of former Coca-Cola Company chairman and philanthropist Robert W. Woodruff, who The Woodruff Arts Center is named after.

Ann Gardner, 2003
Sculpture
Glass mosaic, composite, concrete, steel, terrazzo
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Ring of Water” ‘floats’ in the rotunda of the Courthouse Building and is visible from the exterior of the building through windowpanes framed by large columns. Fifty-six cables, each strung with 10 pods of ‘water,’ hang from an 18-foot ring. When I designed ‘Ring of Water,’ I was thinking about how the presence of water suggests a cooling down of the heat, both the literal summer heat in Atlanta and the figurative emotional heat that fills a courtroom,” said artist Ann Gardner.

Marie T. Cochran and Anthony M. Bingham, 1996
Sculpture
Concrete, bronze, iron, plaster
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Reunion Place” was commissioned for the Olympic Games. It was created through a collaboration between artists Marie T. Cochran and Anthony Bingham and the Mechanicsville community. The piece features a small plaza with four ironwork poles at one end.

Tal Streeter, 1973
Sculpture
Steel
The Woodruff Arts Center

New York artist Tal Streeter (b. 1934) studied the art of kite making in Japan in the early 1970s, which influenced his work. He is known for his work in using traditional kite making techniques in the context of contemporary art as well as his large sculptural works in steel.

Stephanie Gassman, 2013
Sculpture
PVC board, paint, wood
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Reach for the Stars” is a wall relief installation inspired by the Thomasville Recreation Center’s alternate name: “Center of Hope.” The installation depicts the Center’s mantra “Reach for the Stars” along with members of the community reaching for and interacting with images of stars. Various recreational activities are represented, including music, art, and sports.

Barbara Abrelat and others, 1996
Sculpture
Cast concrete, steel, stainless steel
Corporation for Olympic Development in Atlanta
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Sunshade Structure” was required to meet special design constraints, including the capability to withstand heavy vibrations as well as blend in with its surroundings to prevent traffic accidents. The resulting eight-pointed star structure was created by several artists, each of whom created a design for a point of the star. These artists include: Barbara Abrelat, Barbara Butler, Darlyne Dandridge, Nora Ezel, Hazel Fulton, Sharon Henderson, Wini McQueen, Hystercine Rankin and Patricia Stettler. The process of piecing together the structure from the various artists’ pieces resembles that of quilt making. Using natural sunlight, the structure casts intricate shadows on the ground below.

Unknown artist, 1996
Sculpture
Centennial Olympic Park

The Quilt of Olympic Spirit salutes the 10,000 athletes who participated in the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games.

Unknown artist, 1996
Sculpture
Centennial Olympic Park

“The Quilt of Nations” honors all 197 nations that participated in the 1996 Olympic Games. This was the largest number of countries ever represented in the history of the Olympic Games.

Corinna Mensoff, 2008
Sculpture
Painted mild steel, forged steel
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

The Promised Land is a steel piece by metalsmith and Atlanta-based artist Corrina Sephora Mensoff. The title references words from the last speech Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave prior to his assassination, “I’ve been to the mountaintop … And I’ve seen the Promised Land.” The bridge in the center of the piece is modeled after the Edmond Pettius Bridge in Alabama, which was a symbolic obstacle to cross in the civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery. At the end of the road is an equal sign, which was the insignia for CORE, a multi-ethnic activist group during the Civil Rights Movement. A profile of Dr. King is hidden on the right side within the mountain crags. On the left is the profile of Coretta Scott King.

Francesco Somaini, 1970
Sculpture
Bronze
First National Bank of Atlanta
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

The First National Bank of Atlanta commissioned “Phoenix” in 1970. The Phoenix was the original symbol for the bank ever since the conclusion of the Civil War. The sculpture was relocated from the grounds of the bank and later donated to the City of Atlanta in the 1980s when the bank merged with Wachovia and the Phoenix was no longer used as its symbol. Still, the Phoenix is important to the city’s identity as it remembers a city rising from the ashes of destruction.

Sheila Pree Bright, 2003
Vinyl mesh
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Four vinyl banners depict archival printed images of the historic African-American fifth ward community. The banners combine current images of the community and its people with vintage photographs of the historic community, displaying the evolution of the neighborhood. The banners were created by fine arts photographer Sheila Pree Bright, who works to challenge perceptions of reality within contemporary culture. For this particular piece, she stated that the rapid transitioning and loss of qualities of historic African-American communities drive the photographer to document these areas. Each banner bears the inscription “The Rich and Bitter Depth of Your Experience; The Unknown Treasures of Your Inner Life Community.”

Unknown, 1996
Sculpture
Metal and granite

Located at the northern end of the Centennial Olympic Park, this sculpture honors the 1996 Paralympic Games and the 3,310 athletes from 104 countries who participated and set 268 world records. The metal sculpture is surrounded by granite pillars inscribed with the names of each of the paralympic athletes.

Jere Lee Brookshire, 2011
Stainless steel, LEDs
Sculpture
Fulton County Public Art Program

“Ovation” was commissioned by Fulton County as a site-specific sculpture, designed especially to enhance the visitor’s experience at Wolf Creek Amphitheater. Its lighted sculptural forms abstractly represent two concert-goers with their arms raised in excitement and applause, standing side by side. The circular ring elements inscribed in the diamond-shaped concrete platform symbolize Wolf Creek’s proud history as a 1996 Summer Olympic Games venue.

J.L. Mott Iron Works, 1913
Sculpture
Tin, iron and copper
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This cast iron fountain is a replica of a sculpture by Philadelphia-based terra cotta company Galloway & Graff. Its design was inspired by an Italian sculpture exhibited at the United States International Exhibition of 1876, which was the first official World’s Fair for the United States and was held in Philadelphia. “Out in the Rain” was cast by the J.L. Mott Iron Works foundry.

Michael Allman, 2009
Sculpture
Steel, cast concrete, paint
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Our Trees” are two identical pixelated, multi-layered tree silhouettes at each entrance point to Adair Park. The trees are constructed of five green individual successive steel components. Concrete benches, molded to simulate tree trunks, are situated at the base of the structure. The trees pay homage to nature and mankind’s altering of it. Artist Michael Allman wants the sculptured trees to be a symbol of the unfair compensation humans give to the environment in exchange for its resources. The tree stumps represent what humans have taken.

Phil Proctor and Geo Brenick, 2013
Sculpture
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Gifted by The Chelko Foundation to Atlanta, “One Woman Rising” was inspired by Eve Ensler’s “One Billion Rising,” a global day of action calling for the end of violence against women and girls. It was fabricated by Atlanta artisan Phil Proctor and Geo Brenick and painted by World Champion body painters Scott Fray and Madelyn Greco of Living Brush Bodypainting.

Albert Paley, 1990
Sculpture
Forged and fabricated steel, polychrome
AT&T

Albert Paley is a Philadelphia-born metal sculptor. “Olympia” is located in the Promenade II office building courtyard, and is not visible from Peachtree or 15th Streets.

Ted Chatham, 1978
Sculpture
Cor-ten steel
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This abstract sculpture with three stacked “L” shapes is a play sculpture, and children climb on it. Originally it was located in Mayor’s Park, but it was relocated to its current site in 1986 due to road construction. The artist assisted with the relocation. When the sculpture was relocated, the artist asked the children who had played there to sign their names inside it.

GSU Edgewood Sculpture Forum, 1995
Sculpture
Bronze
Truett Cathy and City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

In 1973, Truett Cathy, founder of Chick-fil-A, established the Team Member Scholarship program to encourage his restaurant employees to further their education. It was the first fast food chain to offer this kind of program. In 1994, the company reached its $10 million scholarship milestone and to commemorate the event, commissioned the art and sculpture students of Georgia State University to design a sculpture that would reflect the goals and achievements of the Chick-fil-A scholarship program.

Kevin Cole, 2003
Sculpture
Mixed media, etched aluminum, diabond
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Artist Kevin Cole works in a range of media. He uses repetitive forms and color to create three dimensional structures that invite those who experience his work to reflect upon abstracted references to a necktie used for status, beauty, fashion and the destruction of human life. He was born in Arkansas and lives in Atlanta.

Pavlos Kougioumtzis, 1996
Sculpture
Bronze
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

In honor of the 1996 Olympic Games, the city of Athens, Greece, presented the “Niki” sculpture, a modern rendition of the Winged Victory of Samothrace, as a permanent gift to the city of Atlanta. Located at Atlanta City Hall, the piece is a representation of the victory that results after every effort for the good, the beautiful and the true, which emulate the Olympic Ideals. Artist Pavlos Kougioumtzis is a Greek sculptor, painter and architect.

Donna Pickens, 2001
Mural
Ceramic tile
Fulton County Public Art Program

Using hand-sculpted and glazed ceramic tiles and mosaic glass tesserae, Donna Pickens has created whimsical imagery and bold abstract patterns that suggest rhythm, movement, music, drama, and the visual arts. In the center of the arch, a large sun rises; its six sunrays radiating across the building, dividing the mosaic mural into seven large sections. Sitting on top of the sun is the image of a masked African female figure, representing the Creative Source. From her, streams of color and energy emanate, implying the power of music and rhythm. Images of hands playing instruments, such as the saxophone, guitar, and piano, as well as musical and rhythmic symbols can be seen. Blue mosaic wave patterns honor Judith Jamison, of the Alvin Ailey Dance Company, and her unforgettable performance of the spiritual “Wade in the Water” many years ago. Other panels represent drama, writing, and the visual arts with images of masks, paper and pen, a palette and easel. New Sun Rising enlivens the entrance of Southwest Arts Center and welcomes people to take part in the creativity that lies within.

Diane Kempler, 1996
Bronze, granite, water
Sculpture
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Artist Diane Kempler explains this piece: “The images in my abstracted sculptural forms reflect the duality of death and rebirth, and of the reemergence of creative life forces from destruction and decay.” This sculpture was originally located at Walton Spring Park, which marked Atlanta’s first public water supply. It was moved to Atlanta’s Art Park at Freedom Park to the location of another natural spring.

Frank Toby Martin, 1985
Sculpture
Painted mild steel
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Frank Toby Martin (1951-2012) was a Morehouse College graduate and professor of sculpture and drawing at Spelman College. This work is located in Perkerson Park.

Bond Anderson, 1993
Sculpture
Wood, plastic, aluminum, concrete
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Musical Playscapes” is an accessible, musical playground. This outdoor installation comprises eight wood, aluminum and PVC pipe tuned instruments resembling xylophones. The artist, Bond Anderson, produced this installation to invite people to express themselves through music.

Unknown
Sculpture
Bronze
Turner Field

Monument Grove is a large, park-like area adjacent to the Braves ticket windows. The Hank Aaron, Phil Niekro and Ty Cobb statues from Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium have been relocated to Monument Grove along with the bust of Hank Aaron. In 2003, a statue of Warren Spahn, the winningest pitcher in Braves history, was added to the collection.

Jim Hirschfield and Sonya Ishii, 1994
Sculpture
Bronze, granite, conifer tree
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

A conical bronze sculpture measuring nearly seven feet in height and 17 inches in diameter is the foundation for a coniferous tree, which grows out of the top of the sculpture. The base of the sculpture is made of granite. The piece was created by husband and wife duo Jim Hirschfield and Sonya Ishii. Hirschfield and Ishii have worked collaboratively for more than 30 years.

Jimoh Buriamoh, 1997
Sculpture
Glass mosaic, cement
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This colorful mosaic is by Chief Jimoh Buraimoh. He is one of the most influential artists to emerge from the 1960s experimental workshops in Nigeria known as the Osogbo School of Art, which helped introduce a particular style of modern African art to western cultures. Characteristic of the school, much of his work intermingles traditional Yoruban styles and Western culture. Prolific in oil painting and etching, as well as his signature bead paintings and mosaic murals, his colorful large-scale mosaic murals adorn public areas in Nigeria, Europe and the United States.

Louis Delsarte, 2010
Mural
City of Atlanta City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Across 25 5-by-10-foot steel panels, Louis Delsarte chronicles the entwined story of King and the civil rights movement, from the assassination of Emmett Till to Bull Connor’s attacking police dogs. The mural is populated by dozens of faces, including Rosa Parks, Bobby Kennedy, Malcolm X and Nina Simone.

Kit Yin Snyder, 1986
Sculpture
Stainless steel
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Originally installed in 1986, “Margaret Mitchell Square” features graceful, stainless steel sculptures by renowned artist Kit-Yin Snyder who drew her inspiration from Southern antebellum architecture. It recalls the nearby history of the worldwide premiere of “Gone with the Wind,” which occurred at the now-demolished Loew’s Grand Theatre. Born in Guangzhou, China, Snyder was educated in the United States. She creates site specific installations all around the world.

Sarah Emerson, 2013
Mural
City of Atlanta City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs, Elevate Program

This piece was installed as the sixth mural on S. Broad to continue the artistic face-lift of this street started in 2012. The space now is home to the Mammal Gallery. The title, “Lost and Found” speaks directly to the growth and potential of the street due to the impact of the artwork from 2012.

Trek Matthews, 2012
Murals
Living Walls

Wisconsin-raised Trek Matthews (Atlanta, Ga.) grew up surrounded by nature. His influences of various cultural exploration and urban development result in his style of spiritual and geometric deities to comment on industrialization’s impact on the earth.

Trek Matthews, 2013
Murals
Living Walls

Wisconsin-raised Trek Matthews (Atlanta, Ga.) grew up surrounded by nature. His influences of various cultural exploration and urban development result in his style of spiritual and geometric deities to comment on industrialization’s impact on the earth.

Tika, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Tika was born in Zurich and raised in Egypt. While in Egypt, she became fascinated and obsessed with the art, architecture and mythology of the early Egyptians. This influence remains prevalent in her art, and many of her murals contain animals or creatures that resemble Egyptian architecture as well as aspects of Aztec art.

Sheila Pree Bright, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Sheila Pree Bright is an Atlanta muralist.

Swampy, Gaia and Greg Mike, 2010
Mural
Living Walls

This mural is a collaboration among Gaia (Baltimore, Md.), Swampy (Oakland, Calif.) and Greg Mike (Atlanta, Ga.).

Sarah Emerson, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

This mural by Sarah Emerson is located on the BeltLine Bridge underpass. Emerson started her art career while attending college in Boston and continued while obtaining her Masters of Fine Art at Goldsmiths College in London. Her colorful and abstract paintings reflect forest and nature scenes reminiscent of a Miyazaki film.

Shark Toof, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

Shark Toof’s signature work can be seen on the side of Homegrown. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Shark Toof explores the struggle of predator vs. prey in male and female roles. Shark Toof started painting graffiti in 1985 and has since gained recognition for his signature shark paintings and wheat pastes.

Sam3, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

Artist Sam3 (Murcia, Spain) created this massive mural downtown on the Comfort Suites Hotel. It is Living Wall’s largest wall and is also part of Atlanta’s Elevate project.

Ripo, 2010
Mural
Living Walls

Ripo is a New York native who now resides in Barcelona. Growing up in the skateboarding scene exposed him to a global community of travelers. His calligraphic letters are often loaded with intelligently crafted sarcasm.

ROA, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

Belgiam artist ROA’s famous alligator can be seen sprawling across an apartment building near Five Points MARTA Station.

Pastel, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

This mural by Pastel (Buenos Aires, Argentina) is located next to JAZ’s wall on Flat Shoals Avenue.

Ramed, 2010
Mural
Living Walls

Remed (Paris, France) is an immensely prolific artist with an ability to translate his unusual Art Nouveau style onto any surface. Influenced by a Moroccan style of painting, Remed interacts color with shape in a visually stunning manner. He holds an independent passion to live creatively, both mentally and physically.

Never, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

Artist Never (Brooklyn, N.Y.) has academic roots in graphic design and handmade typography, which have become a huge influence in his work. His iconic owls are generally seen in darker and emotional situations to complement his pristine signage and traditional design aesthetic.

Ola Bad and Howdy Nater, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

This mural is a collaboration between Ola Bad and Howdy Nater and is located off the railroad. Ola Bad (Atlanta, Ga.) got his name from the missing letters of a street sign. He’s best known for wheat pasting delicate charcoal drawings of facial expressions onto walls and water towers, or strategically placed and pasted dreamcatchers above the sleeping homeless. Howdy Nater is also from Atlanta, Ga.

Neuzz, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Neuzz is a street artist from Mexico City, Mexico.

Moniker, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Moniker is a street artist from Atlanta, Ga.

Nanook, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

Street artist Nanook (Baltimore, MD) creates heavily contoured and lined figures that nearly induce vertigo upon the viewer. His immensely detailed wheat-pastes can be seen across the United States.

MOMO, 2014
Mural
Living Walls

Street muralist MOMO was born in San Francisco in 1974. He currently lives in New York but also keeps a studio in New Orleans. This mural was a collaboration between Living Walls and the Boulevard Tunnel Initiative (BTI) to enhance the Boulevard Tunnel, the main connector between the Old Fourth Ward and Cabbagetown neighborhoods.

Molly Rose Freeman, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

This mural by Molly Rose Freeman is located on the Whitefoord Bridge. Freeman (Memphis, Tenn.) is a versatile artist from Memphis who has lived and done work around the Southeastern U.S. She has an uncanny ability to manipulate the medium to suit her style; she’s worked on multiple mediums, from murals to films and performance art. Her art focuses on shapes and lines creating forms on their own, unlike many other artists who create distinct forms using these shapes and lines.

Molly Rose Freeman, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

This mural by Molly Rose Freeman is located on Tomatillos restaurant. Freeman (Memphis, Tenn.) is a versatile artist who has lived and done work around the Southeastern U.S. She has an uncanny ability to manipulate the medium to suit her style; she’s worked on multiple mediums, from murals to films and performance art. Her art focuses on shapes and lines creating forms on their own, unlike many other artists who create distinct forms using these shapes and lines.

Miso, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Australian artist Miso has a style that appeals to the human senses. This style comes from the fact that most of her art depicts women in all types of social and economic situations. While growing up in Melbourne, Miso was very exposed to street art, and this exposure is what pushed her towards becoming an artist. Now, Miso mainly creates her works from paper, and then pastes the work into the streets or in an art exhibit.

Michi Meko, 2010
Mural
Living Walls

Michi Meko (Atlanta, Ga.) is a multidisciplinary artist who draws from rural Southern and contemporary urban cultures. By hybridizing and remixing his work into a multilingual dialect, Meko creates a new identity for ordinary and rejected images.

Matt Haffner and Laura Bell, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

Matt Haffner and Laura Bell are both artists from Atlanta, Ga.

Marcy Starz, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

Marcy Starz is a street muralist from Atlanta, Ga.

LNY, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

This mural by LNY (Newark, N.J.) is located behind SoPo Bike Coop in East Atlanta.

LNY, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

This wall by LNY (Newark, NJ) is adjacent to Escif’s piece at Underground Atlanta.

Letrs, Perve and Blief, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

This work consists of three murals at the corner of Arizona Avenue and La France Street (on La France). Letrs (Atlanta) grew up in the world of underground graffiti, where he developed his versatile style. Perve (Atlanta) creates ever-evolving graffiti pieces that are inspired by past works, hip hop, and the up-and-coming trends. After participating in Living Walls, Blief (Oakland, Calif.) considered moving to the city. He’s painted an eight passenger van, the back of the Goat Farm and a wall off Arizona Avenue for Living Walls.

Know Hope, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

There are various components that reveal the ever-changing messages found in Know Hope’s works. Know Hope (Tel Aviv, Israel) has been focusing on one character that vicariously absorbs experiences of struggle and courage from people, places and memories. He believes in the ever evolving and continuous flow of creating new ideas that give light to his character’s condition. Know Hope’s works can be found in the Middle East, Europe and North America.

Know Hope, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

There are various components that reveal the ever-changing messages found in Know Hope’s works. Know Hope (Tel Aviv, Israel) has been focusing on one character that vicariously absorbs experiences of struggle and courage from people, places and memories. He believes in the ever evolving and continuous flow of creating new ideas that give light to his character’s condition. Know Hope’s works can be found in the Middle East, Europe and North America.

Karen Tauches, 2012
Commercial sign
Living Walls

Karen Tauches (Atlanta, Ga.) is a snarky and sociological aware artist who focuses on the harms of consumerism and contemporary commercial culture. She alters found signs for installations in addition to her large neon signs boasting clever remarks on the audience itself.

JR, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

This mural by JR (Paris, France) titled “I Am a Man” commemorates the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Part of the mural is in decay due to time and weathering.

JR, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

This mural by JR (Paris, France) titled “March on Washington” commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

JR, 2014
Mural
Living Walls

JR is from Paris, France. This “No More Hunger” mural commemorates the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. The photo is Steven Blum’s “Pickets at Dept. of Agriculture” (1968).

Living Walls: Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Jessie Unterhalter (Baltimore, Md.) is an artist striving to turn gray, disintegrating areas into something colorful and vibrant. Her murals are not solely limited to paint, often incorporating discarded scraps of plastic, metal and wood. One of the many artists she collaborates with is Katey Truhn (Baltimore, Md.). Together, they have repeatedly constructed larger-than life murals which revitalize the neighborhoods. Some of these murals use inspiration from board games to actively encourage participation.

JD Koth, 2012
Sculpture
Living Walls

JD Koth (Atlanta, Ga.) repurposed this East Atlanta phone booth as part of the 2012 Living Walls project.

JAZ, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

JAZ is a street muralist from Buenos Aires, Argentina.

JAZ, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

JAZ is a street muralist from Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Jason Kofke, 2010
Mural
Living Walls

Jason Kofke (Atlanta) grew up in the shadow of the Cold War and the NASA program. This upbringing gave him many ideas about fear and mentality that eventually directed him toward the fine arts. He received BFA in painting from SCAD in 2005 and MFA in painting in 2010. Kofke taught letterpress techniques at Atlanta Printmaker’s Studio. He has recently worked in China and Russia.

Interesni Kazki, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Interesni Kazki (Kiev, Ukraine) is a Ukrainian duo who share a craving for surrealist styled art and whimsical illusive worlds. Their works can be best described as an impeccable marriage between muralism and graffiti art.

Gyun Hur, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

Gyun Hur is an interdisciplinary artist from Atlanta, Ga. Known for her performance art and physical installations, she painted her first mural for Living Walls Conference 2013. She is currently the Professor of Foundations at SCAD Hong Kong.

Freddy Sam, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

Freddy Sam is a muralist from Cape Town, South Africa.

Feral Child and Russia, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

This mural is a collaboration between artists Feral Child and Russia. Feral Child (Oakland, Calif.) has been working in the streets for the past five years, creating murals influenced by folk art, activism, geometry and nature. Russia (Atlanta, Ga.) has a love for graffiti and traditional cubism, which shows in his 2011 Living Walls debut.

Feral Child, 2010
Mural
Living Walls

This mural is located on the side of Homegrown. Feral Child (Oakland, Calif.) is influenced by folk art, activism, geometry and nature. His work often represents optimism in the face of a world gone mad and can be found on forgotten city walls around the world and on freight trains traveling across North America.

Fefe, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Street artist Fefe Talavera (São Paulo, Brazil) is inspired by the tribal art she discovered while working in the streets of São Paulo. Because of her hometown’s social and economic problems, the urban environment became dilapidated. Fefe took advantage of this negative aspect by utilizing the contradiction of her art to the destroyed walls in order to show the beauty of the community there. The monstrous characters shown in her works are meant to reflect human emotions such as anger and desire and send a powerful message to the viewer.

Faber, 2010
Mural
Living Walls

Faber (Lima, Peru) understands the delicate juxtaposition of the archaic and the avant-garde. He prefers to work in public spaces that are forgotten or marked by time, like abandoned houses, empty factories and blank walls. Faber blends street art and graffiti sensibilities to form his own colorful style.

Escif, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

Escif is a muralist from Valencia, Spain.

Eme, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

This mural is located under the DeKalb Avenue Bridge. Spanish street artist Eme is entirely self-taught and found inspiration from the graffiti of Murcia, Spain, where she grew up. Her works can be seen as humorous as most of her pieces contain cartoonish characters. She also tries to send a message to viewers of her murals, which she does by including one or two words in the mural.

Elian, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

Elian was born in 1988 in Córdoba, Argentina, where he currently still resides. He is an autodidact artist and Co- Director of The Kosovo Gallery of Contemporary Art & Street Culture.

Doodles, 2010
Mural
Living Walls

California artist Doodles painted this mural on the side of Jai Sanit Yoga Studio. Doodles’ lively characters appear in railroad tracks, fine art galleries and the Mexican countryside. His work is inspired by cross continental travels and various cultural phenomena experienced in specific time and spaces.

Christopher Derek Bruno, Benjamin Niznik and Drew Tyndell, 2011
Mural
Living Walls

Located behind the Paris on Ponce store, this mural was created by Atlanta artists Christopher Derek Bruno and Drew Tyndell along with Vermont’s Benjamin Niznik.

Christopher Derek Bruno, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

Atlanta street muralist Christopher Derek Bruno painted this mural, “Passing Through Walls,” on the back of Graveyard Tavern in East Atlanta.

Axel Void, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Axel Void (Berlin, Germany), whose biographical roots lie in Haiti, Miami and Andalusia, is part of a generation of young painters who derive their dynamics from graffiti culture and urban art. Touching upon these categories, Void pulls past them and opens up his concept of art to such an extent that his work be classified only with difficulty. He moves between murals, spray cans, installation, oil and acrylic paintings, audio and video recordings, and countless drawings, the mirror of his tireless labor urge. Uncomfortable, unpleasant and psychological social issues dominate Axel Void’s work.

Andrzej Urbanski and Indigo, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Andrzej Urbanski is a German muralist who uses experimental forms, shapes and geometrical structures and a wide range of color-segments. Canada’s Indigo has been creating vivid murals using stencils and paint since 2008. She grew up in Vancouver, but has since traveled all over the world painting murals. Her paintings usually depict somber, contemplative people inspired by photographs.

Agostino Iacurci, 2012
Mural
Living Walls

Visible from Memorial Drive, this mural is on the front of the Reynoldstown Lofts. The artist, Italy’s Agostino Iacurci, lives and works between Rome and Nuremberg. He creates bright multi-layered images, used either for drawings and etchings or for big murals, taking inspiration from every day life and playing with synthetic shapes, bright colors and open titles.

3ttman, 2013
Mural
Living Walls

3ttman (pronounced “three têtes man” or “the man with three heads”) is a French-born artist based in Madrid. His versatile style combines cartoon graphics with forms inspired by his travels to distant lands. 3ttman frequently works in the street, because it allows the artists to express themselves freely and have an unfiltered dialogue with the public. His interactions with space and his colorful paintings led him to work with the Tate Modern (Street walking tour 2008), The Country (ARC 2012), the creation of a 30 meter mosaic wall with the Spanish embassy in Hanoi (2010), murals in the Monumental in Kiev with the French Embassy in Almeria with Greenpeace.

OverUnder, Labrona and Gawd, 2011
Mural
Living Walls and Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Part of both Art on the BeltLine and Living Walls, this mural is a collaboration among artists Labrona (Montreal), OverUnder (New York City) and Gawd (Montreal). It champions the pedestrian over automotive transit with colors that speak to the multicultural and varied communities that make up Atlanta.

Odeleye Ayokunle, 2000
Sculpture
Stainless Steel
Fulton County Public Art Program

Ayokunle Odeleye’s hand-formed, stainless steel panels flank the entrance of the library, mimicking gates to an ancient temple. The images on the panels represent a diversity of subject areas that can be found within a library’s reading material and are designed to suggest to young people all the wonderful range of things that can be discovered through the activity of reading.

Carl Joe Williams, 2003
Mural
Photographic, paint on metal
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This mural by New Orleans artist Carl Joe Williams has an abstract background of concentric circles and horizontal wave-like details along the lower half of the piece. Located at the Washington Park Tennis Center, this piece superimposes black and white images of famous African-American tennis players, like Arthur Ashe.

Eleanor Hand, 2009
Sculpture
Copper, stainless steel, granite
Fulton County Public Art Program

During the time artist Eleanor Hand was working collaboratively with the participants at the Harriett G. Darnell Senior Multipurpose Facility to design this sculpture, she heard a speech on the radio given by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from 1963. “We must keep moving. If you can’t fly, run. If you can’t run, walk; if you can’t walk, crawl; but by all means, keep moving.” These sentiments seemed to capture perfectly the seniors’ values and the various activities of this senior facility. The four figures – a flying woman, a running man, a walking woman and a crawling baby, all with their arms outstretched – were inspired by the quotation.

C.C. Crouch, 1906
Sculpture
Stone carving, granite, Georgia marble
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This portrait of Jasper Newton Smith depicts him at age 73. He modelled for this sculpture, and it was placed above his mausoleum during his lifetime. He has thinning hair and a moustache and wears a jacket, but no tie. Smith was an eccentric businessman who became successful in the brick business in Atlanta during the Construction Era, reportedly creating some 10 million bricks for Atlanta construction. Engraved on the side of the sculpture is “Jasper N. Smith Born in Walton Co. GA Dec. 29, 1833. A Noble Atlantan Who Built an Empire With His Own Hands”.

Phil Proctor, 2013
Sculpture
Railroad spikes, rails
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Located just north of the skate park in Old Fourth Ward on the Atlanta BeltLine, Phil Proctor’s “Iron Column” is 24 feet tall and made out of railroad metal from the actual BeltLine.

Eleanor Hand, 1993
Sculpture
Painted iron, wood
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This playground structure of a house encompassed by a heart is made up of iron and wood. It was created by artist and architect Eleanor Hand, whose collaborative style invites participants to “experience the magic of the creative process and the celebration of the community.” Hand engaged children of the local community in the design and construction of this sculpture, and this final piece reflects the community’s favorite design by the children.

Zachary Coffin, 2004
Sculpture
Steel and granite
Lindbergh City Center

Located on Camellia Circle in Lindbergh City Center complex, Atlanta native Zachary Coffin’s sculpture depicts a hydrogen atom with a granite proton and stainless steel electron. When the wind is right, both remain in constant motion on a 20-foot ring.

Roy Lichtenstein, 1997 (fabricated 2002)
Painted aluminum
High Museum of Art

Among Pop icon Roy Lichtenstein’s last subjects was the image of the suburban American home. The smaller-than-life sculpture House III evolved from Lichtenstein’s large-scale Interior paintings of the early 1990s and from work that revived his interest in playing with perspective. Exploring inverted perspective and symbolically complex messages of housing and shelter, the corner of the piece appears to project forward toward the viewer. However, by walking around the work one sees that the corner actually recedes and that the eye has been fooled.

Zachary Coffin, 2009
Sculpture
Galvanized steel, stainless steel, granite boulders
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Horn Section” evokes the musical memorial that the name of Cleopas Johnson Park represents. The park was named after an influential band teacher at Morris Brown College. True to form for sculptor Zachary Coffin, the metal, 37-feet-tall work has horn features that move kinetically with the wind.

Kenneth Allen Wilson, 1996
Sculpture
Concrete, metal, glass, marble, tile, paint
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This installation is dedicated to Howard Finster, an influential Georgia artist and Baptist minister. Made out of concrete, metal, glass, marble and tile, the wall structure is created by concrete casted as honeycombs combined with other materials. In the interior of the wall is a temple structure as well as caste images of trees, a cat and hands. The artist, Kenneth Allen Wilson, is Finster’s grandson. His works are often created from recycled glass bottles.

Xavier Medina, 1996
Sculpture
Plate steel
Cultural Legacy Initiative

This dramatic sculpture — a profile of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his arm outstretched — welcomes people to the King National Historic Site at the southwest corner of Boulevard and Freedom Parkway. It was commissioned by the Cultural Legacy Initiative, which brought major permanent public works of art to Atlanta from Barcelona — the 1992 Summer Olympic City — as an Olympic cultural exchange. Cut and rolled from plate steel, the sculpture is integrated with the bicycle and pedestrian path project linking the Georgia Institute of Technology to Freedom Parkway.

Stuart Romm, Fred Pearsall and Harris Dimitropoulos, 1996
Architecture
Granite, concrete
Corporation for Olympic Development in Atlanta
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Located on a prominent high point in the Summerhill community, Heritage Park overlooks the surrounding neighborhood, downtown Atlanta, and Turner Field. The Park was developed as a passive open space to serve as a gateway into Summerhill and the surrounding Greenlea Commons North townhome development. In addition to green space, the park contains a monument to the Summerhill’s founders and its complex history. Three Georgia Tech architecture professors collaborated on this piece, Stuart Romm, Frederick Pearsall and Harris Dimitropoulos.

Beverly Buchanan, 1988
Sculpture
Painted corrugated tin
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Beverly Buchanan’s work has a strong focus on remembering the look and feel of structures. The house and its yard are often the subject of her work, which focuses on the idea of memory versus reality. Buchanan sees the sharecropper’s shack, a disappearing fixture in the rural Southern landscape, as an enduring image of vitality and creativity that is animated by the hopes and dreams of its inhabitants.

Marianne Weinberg-Benson, 2001
Sculpture
Industrial Brick
Fulton County Public Art Program

From the brick columns flanking the entryway to the Southwest Arts Center emerge “The Greeters.” Life-sized figures of young performers, a boy and a girl, are carved from industrial brick in bas relief. Acting as gateway portals to this building, “The Greeters” announce to all visitors the art center’s mission of education in the performing and visual arts. The boy, “Enkosi,” is an African drummer named for Enkosi Johnson, a young boy in South Africa who showed great courage in the face of dying from AIDS. He represents the freedom of an inner rhythm and the courage to embrace it. The girl, “Jewel,” is a ballerina who represents the jewel in everyone that can be discovered by the joys of self-expression. Combined with the Donna Pickens’ lyrical mosaic above them, the voice and song of “The Greeters” illuminates the building and draws the community in.

Martin Dawe and Randy Blain, 1995
Sculpture
Bronze

Located in front of the Atlanta Fish Market, “Great Fish” is 65 feet tall. The 18-inch model was rendered by Martin Dawe and the full-size version was fashioned over six months by Randy Blain.

Steve Steinman, 1980
Sculpture
Bronze, granite
Atlanta Bar Association
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

In the summer of 1979 until the spring of 1981, a series of murders committed in Atlanta rocked the nation. The Atlanta Child Murders, known as the “missing and murdered children cases,” took the lives of 28 African-American children. During this time the morale of the city and especially the Atlanta Police Department was low. To help bolster the pride of the city, the Atlanta Bar Association commissioned artist Steve Steinman to create a monument to slain police officers. The monument, located in Woodruff Park, promotes an appreciation of officers lost in the line of duty and pride for their sacrifice. The highlight of the sculpture is a life-casting of a child’s hand holding the hand of a police officer. After an intense two-year period, the crime was solved.

Charles Mitchell, 1981
Sculpture
Bronze, limestone
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This sundial was given to Atlanta by the Federal Republic of Germany in 1983 in celebration of centuries of German heritage in America. The bronze sundial was built in Germany by a master craftsman while the limestone base was carved by local artist Charles Mitchell. It sits adjacent to Andrew Young Plaza. The dedication in 1983 featured a weeklong celebration that more than 28,000 people participated in, with activities ranging from art exhibits and film to performances by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.

Raymond Kaskey, 1996
Sculpture
Bronze
Corporation for Olympic Development

This sculpture pays homage to the founder of the modern Olympics, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, and to the ideals of the Games.

Elisa Arimany, 1996
Sculpture
Cor-ten steel
Corporation for Olympic Development

“Games” is an abstract steel sculpture commemorating the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. It features five open boxes and an open circle positioned asymmetrically on a concrete base. “Games” marks the cultural exchange that occurred between the 1992 host of the Olympics, Barcelona, Spain and Atlanta, which followed Barcelona as host. It was commissioned by the Cultural Legacy Initiative, which brought this piece and other major permanent public works of art to Atlanta from Barcelona.

R.A. Miller (Fabricated by Harold Rittenberg), 1996
Sculpture
Mild steel, paint
Corporation for Olympic Development in Atlanta
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Folk Art Park pays homage to the rich and deep tradition of Southern folk art.

Eddie Owens Martin (St. EOM)
Sculpture
Concrete, paint
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This piece is an homage to folk artist Eddie Owens Martin’s homestead called Pasaquan, which is a seven acre artscape consisting of six buildings painted with vibrant colors and patterns. Pasaquan also houses over 2,000 pieces of St. EOM’s other artwork, including drawings, paintings and sculptures. Six years after St. EOM committed suicide, the Historical Society created the Pasaquan Preservation Society, which continues to preserve the site and opens it to the public a few days a year.

Wayne Caudell, 1996
Sculpture
Steel, plastic
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Gourd trees were originally constructed by Native Americans to attract a type of bird called the purple martin. The practice was continued by European colonists when they arrived in the United States and has become a longstanding folk art form. Today purple martins rely exclusively on these manmade homes for shelter. While this installation has aesthetic value, it also carries a practical use in providing nesting homes for birds.

Harold Rittenberry, 1996
Sculpture
Mild steel, paint
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Artist Harold Rittenberry (Athens, Ga.) did not start making official art pieces until later in life. He began experimenting with a blowtorch, which led him to work primarily with metal, though he also creates drawings and mixed-media works. He draws inspiration from the natural world, and different images in his work have different have meanings. For example, flocks of birds symbolize thought, while snakes symbolize wisdom.

Willie Tarver, 1996
Sculpture
Concrete, foam, paint
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Wille Tarver, a welder and self taught artist, was born in 1932 in Wadley, Ga. As the son of a sharecropper, Tarver’s life was influenced by religion, farm life and slavery. These influences are reflected in his folk art sculptures and paintings.

Lonnie Holley, 1996
Sculpture
Styrofoam, concrete, paint
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Artist Lonnie Holley was born on February 10, 1950, in Birmingham, Ala., the seventh of 27 children. As a young man, he drifted around the South and eventually settled in Birmingham, where he lives today. When his sister’s two children died in a house fire in 1979, the family could not afford to buy tombstones for the children, so he decided to make them himself. The Tombstones were Holley’s first works of art. He soon began to create an environment of found materials that he assembled in his yard. Holley’s materials for his works progressed from industrial-made sandstone to found objects to painting. In his conceptualization of human and animal forms and his strong emphasis on the spiritual world and ancestral heritage, Holley gives people a glimpse of West African, Egyptian and Pre-Columbian influences. At the same time, his abstract, geometric forms relate to the works of other 20th century artists.

Richard MacDonald, 1996
Sculpture
Bronze
Corporation of Olympic Development

At a height of more than 26 feet, the masterful sculpture of a gymnast strained in the execution of the move called the “Flair” is both powerful and commanding. Created for the 1996 Atlanta Summer Olympics, “Flair Across America” celebrates the triumph of the human spirit and the idealization of the human form while promoting an appreciation for the arts within diverse communities. The massive sculpture of a gymnast highlights the athletes struggle and ultimate triumph, representing the power and heroic determination that inspire Olympians to excel.

George Beasley, 1996
Sculpture
Galvanized mild steel, bronze, granite
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Thirty-six feet in height, the “Five Points Monument” commemorates the historic intersection where trolley tracks and an artesian water tower once stood, as well as the five streets that intersect to form the heart of Downtown Atlanta. The sculpture is an asymmetric interpretation of the water tower’s traditional girder construction, its structural steel trusses alluding to the trolley tracks now buried below the street. An adjacent smaller sculpture displays texts that focus on the history and destination of each of the five streets forming the intersection: Peachtree, Edgewood, Decatur, Whitehall (South Peachtree), and Marietta. Bronze panels reference the area’s history through text, maps and other formal data.

Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier, 1992
Mural
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Artist Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier states, “Every letter in the alphabet and numbers from 1 through 9 are present in the six panels. It is intended that a parent may use these familiar symbols as a teaching tool for young children. Games such as ‘How many green fish can you find?’ or ‘Can you find the letter ‘A’?” could be played by a parent with young children. The swimmers themselves are not only graceful but athletic as well. They swim close to the lake floor and are unyielding as they encounter many alien creatures that inhabit this body of water. Although subtle, the figures evoke strength and pride as they ‘push forward’ to the water’s surface where they will encounter the stars. The ‘Six Swimmers’ announce quite boldly that what lies on the other side of the bathhouse promises to be an aquatic adventure- both real and imagined.”

Elbert Weinberg, 1964
Sculpture
Bronze

American sculptor Elbert Weinberg created this eagle sculpture at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in 1964 in Rome, Italy. It moved with the Bank from its original location to this Midtown corner in 2001. The five columns that stand in front of the current building also came from the original building. Perched atop one of the columns is the 3,300-pound cast bronze eagle.

Deanna Sirlin, 2011
Mosaic tile
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Falling Waters” is a mosaic made out of one-inch tiles depict flow and motion of water. The curved wall on which the tiles are placed add to the watery effect the artist is trying to achieve. The mosaic is two stories high and faces out into the street.

John Thomas Riddle Jr., 1976
Sculpture
Bronze
Georgia Legislative Black Caucus

This sculpture by John Thomas Riddle Jr. (1934-2002) sits on the northeast corner of the Georgia State Capitol grounds facing Capitol Avenue. The six-foot-tall bronze piece is a memorial to 33 African-American legislators who were expelled from the Georgia General Assembly in 1868. It was commissioned by the Georgia Legislative Black Caucus in 1976.

Maria Artemis, 1996
Sculpture
Aluminum, steel, paint
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

The piece is fabricated from aircraft elements donated by Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems and was intentionally built within an urban landscape to ease pedestrian direction and circulation by acting as a link between the Civic Center Marta Station and the Civic Center. The title of the work originates from a stencil found on one of the engine pylons, which read, “Ex-Static Test Program.” The art also features a sign from the Science & Technology Museum of Atlanta (SciTrek), which closed in 2004.

John Massey Rhind, c. 1895
Sculpture
Painted iron, marble granite
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

A round iron fountain stands at just over three feet tall and is surrounded by a semi-circular bench decorated with Zodiac signs. The fountain’s pedestal reads: “Glorious Water, Glorious Water.” The surrounding bench’s arms are dolphins, and its sides feature undersea scenes with carved seaweed and crabs. The fountain was given to the city of Atlanta in 1896 in honor of Judge Erskine, an Irish immigrant who served as a United States judge for the district court of Georgia from 1865 to 1883. A long time resident of Atlanta (his house on Peachtree Street was torn down in 1864 and used for timber to build cabins for Sherman’s troops), the judge had always wanted to give a fountain to his adopted hometown. He died before he got the chance, and his daughter carried out her father’s wish. The fountain was originally placed at the intersection of Peachtree and West Peachtree Streets. In 1912, the Erskine fountain was relocated to Grant Park’s Ormond Street entrance when Peachtree and West Peachtree were regraded and widened, leaving the fountain four feet above street level.

Mark Smith, 1981
Sculpture
Bronze
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Local sculptor Mark Smith created this centrally located abstracted male figure posed in the process of standing up from a crouching position. Originally the flat polished surfaces on top of the figure reflected the moving streetscape and surrounding skyscrapers. The artist stated that the highly polished metal had a mirror finish that created symbolism of contemporary/urban man “emerging” in the context of the built environment. The artist wanted each view of the piece from the several approaching streets to be dramatically different. He left a hand print in the plaster in the figure’s left leg to mark his spirit in place and time.

Adrian Barzaga, 2012
Mural
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This 2012 commission by the City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affair’s annual art exhibition, Elevate Atlanta, heightened the visual aesthetics of downtown Atlanta and the Five Points area by improving the appearance of this historic central area structure through a contemporary facade installation. This five story building once served as a thriving hub of activity for the Atlanta Constitution newspaper. Through this minimal contemporary facade design, the artist looks to illustrate the nervous human-like energy within the building as it currently knows not what the future holds in store. Adrian Barzaga is an Atlanta based artist and a graduate of Georgia State University Ernest G. Welch School of Art and Design.

Push, 2012
Mural
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs, Elevate Program

Push is a street artist originally from the Hawaiian Islands who now lives in Los Angeles, Calif. This mural is part of the “Elevate South Broad Mural Project.”

Sever, 2012
Mural
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Sever is an Atlanta graffiti artist and muralist. This mural, “I’m Not a Player I Just Read A Lot,” was created as part of the “Elevate South Broad Mural Projects” project in 2012.

Born, 2012
Mural
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Born (Atlanta, GA) is a former graffiti artist who also now makes sculptures with found objects. This mural was created as part of the “Elevate South Broad Mural Projects” project.

Anthony Liggins, 2004S
Sculpture
Stainless steel with powder coat
MARTA

Atlanta and Miami-based artist Anthony Liggins created these sculptures as an homage to Atlanta’s vibrant cultural diversity. The sculptures are titled (from left to right) Zen, Ali, Joe and Latin Heat.

William F. Conway and Marcy Schulte, 1996
Architecture
Concrete, mild steel, paint
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“De-Code/Re-Code Atlanta” creates a public space on the site of a former traffic island in the heart of downtown Atlanta, while reclaiming the history of the place. Through both language and design, the installation weaves together a narrative of the viaduct “gulch area” and its inhabitants, past and present. The site includes seating, overhead shade devices, lighting, and planting — all helping to accommodate a wide range of public activity. Located at the intersection of Central Avenue and Decatur Street, it also serves as the southwest gateway to the Georgia State University Urban Campus.

Curtis Patterson, 1977
Sculpture
Cor-ten steel, concrete
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

The geometric, abstract steel sculpture draws heavily on African motifs and resembles interlocking wrenches. The scale of the piece invites the viewer to walk around the work and get involved.

Harold Rittenberry, 2003
Architecture
Steel
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This steel gate to the Municipal Court Building depicts a landscape scene with a man sitting under a tree. A pond, birds, the sun and other figures are cut out of the metal. “I see things and they’ll speak to me awhile, sometimes I’ll even have a dream about them, and then after awhile it comes out in the drawing,” artist Harold Rittenberry explains, noting in the case of many of the tree drawings, the work is from his memory of trees and woods that are no longer there. “It’s a protest in my mind about deforestation,” he continues. “I draw the trees so people can see them, and it puts it in their minds how beautiful they are.”

Ayokunle Odeleye, 2012
Sculpture
Stainless steel, bronze, granite
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Ayokunle Odeleye’s concept for “Chi Wara Sundial Lantern” is derived from the “Chi Wara,” a mythical animal of an ethnic group of people in Mali along the West African coast. The Chi Wara is used as a headdress in special ceremonial harvest dances designed to pass on knowledge from wise elders to young people in the village. This work visually interprets this mythological image and conceptually uses it to suggest the ceremonial passing of scholarship from Cascade elders to the youth of this community. Engraved on the plates are names of significant individuals from the Cascade area who have made political, spiritual and cultural contributions to the community and the city.

Ed Dwight
Sculpture
Bronze, granite
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Charles L. Harper was the first principal of Booker T. Washington High School, which opened in 1924 as the city’s first post-6th grade public education institution for African-Americans. Harper-Archer Middle School and Charles L. Harper Memorial Park carry his name. Harper graduated from Morris Brown College and worked as principal of the Morris Brown College high school program before becoming principal of Washington. The strong leadership of Professor Harper and the faculty had a tremendous influence on the students. Harper was an education and civil rights leader known throughout the state for lobbying for better pay for African-American teachers and more state aid for black graduate students. When Harper retired in 1942, Washington High was home to 4,200 students and the largest African-American high school in the U.S.

Jedd Novatt, 2009
Sculpture
SCAD Atlanta

Spanish sculpture artist Jedd Novatt created this 14-foot-tall by 10-foot-wide sculpture in his Basque studio. It is part of Novatt’s series of “Chaos” sculptures, which focus on cube-like forms resting on top of one another.

Maria Artemis, 1994
Sculpture
Bronze, granite
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This inlaid circular plaque built with sandblasted texts measures about 19 feet in diameter. The work has decorative swirls and is labeled with familial relationships: mother, father, sister, brother, son, daughter, friend, etc.

Unknown, 1995
Architecture
Steel
Taz Anderson Realty

This 12-story Olympic Tower that sits next to I-75/85 near North Avenue and The Varsity was built in 1995. The 16-foot flame is a replica of the Statue of Liberty flame, while the supporting structure resembles the Olympic Torch. During the 1996 Olympics, tourists were able to visit the 105-foot high observation deck.

Siah Armajani, 1996
Architecture
Steel
Atlanta Public Art Legacy Fund

The Centennial Olympic Caldron is mounted above a 132-foot tower and accessible by a 190-foot long bridge. It is essentially a piece of sheet steel rolled into a cone. Even though it is 21 feet tall, it appears dwarfed by the structure on which it stands. Conceived by Minnesota-based artist Siah Armajani, the caldron uses tiles of Georgia red clay to trace the top edge of the spiral formed by the twisting of the cone.

Jeffry Loy, 2007
Architecture
Mild steel, forged and painted
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This steel work fence repeats the shape of a cattail plant, which is a unique wetland plant characterized by its tall grassy appearance and flowering spikes. The depiction of cattails in a steel fence reflects the combined natural and man-made contexts of Dean Rusk Park.

Henri Jova, Stanley Daniels and John Busby, 1996
Architecture
Marble
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This beaux-arts pavilion was created from the intricate facade of the downtown Carnegie Central Library, which was built in 1901 and demolished in 1977 to make way for the Atlanta-Fulton County Library that now stands on the site. Fortunately, these architectural bays were preserved and ultimately used to create this elegant 23 foot square pavilion in 1996. In homage to the Carnegie legacy, it is a monument to higher education in Atlanta with the seals of nine local area colleges and universities embedded in the pavilion floor. The interdisciplinary design firm Jova/Daniels/Busby came up for a plan for the pavilion and handled its construction.

Charles Keck, 1927
Sculpture
Bronze, Georgia marble
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This statue was commissioned by Booker T. Washington High School’s principal, Charles Lincoln Harper, in 1927. The statue is the only duplicate of the original, which stands on the grounds of Tuskegee University and the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site. The statue of Washington has an inscription that reads: “He lifted the veil of ignorance from his people and pointed the way to progress through education and industry.”

Amy Landesberg, 1996
Sculpture
Anodized and painted steel
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Birth of Atlanta” commemorates the 1837 founding of Atlanta, or Marthasville as it was known at the time. The monument consists of a steel frame with seven pairs of perforated metal “feathers and wings” in flight. Its design makes an abstract reference to the Phoenix, the Greek mythological bird that rose from the ashes. Atlanta’s Civil War history and the burning of Atlanta by General Sherman led Atlanta to take up the symbol of the phoenix.

Patrick Morelli, 1989
Sculpture
Bronze, granite
National Park Service

Located at King National Historic Site, “Behold” is inspired by the Baptism scene in Alex Haley’s book “Root.”

Christopher Fennel, 2009
Sculpture
Louisville Slugger baseball bats
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Bats, Baseball” was built at Sloss Furnaces in Birmingham, Alabama. The piece was built in separate sections and then welded together. John Hillerich, whose family created the Louisville Slugger, donated 600 Louisville Sluggers to build the piece.

Paul Manship and John Portman, 1992
Sculpture
Bronze

A pair of bronze naked dancers toss ribbons as they look skywards up to the SunTrust building. The dancers were adapted by architect John Portman and are based on the 3-foot originals by famous American sculptor Paul Manship.

Brian Owens, 1996
Bas Relief
Bronze
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Commemorative relief sculptures located along Auburn Avenue pay tribute to the lives and contributions of four community leaders: James Tate, Carrie Steele Logan, Alice Dugged Cary, and Wesley Chapel Redding. Each sculpture mounted on a granite pylon is a bas relief portrait of the honored individual and includes text about his or her contribution to the development of the “Sweet Auburn” community. A former slave, Redding greatly influenced commerce on Auburn Avenue with his business, legal, and banking skills.

Brian Owens, 1996
Bas Relief
Bronze
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Commemorative relief sculptures located along Auburn Avenue pay tribute to the lives and contributions of four community leaders: James Tate, Carrie Steele Logan, Alice Dugged Cary, and Wesley Chapel Redding. Each sculpture mounted on a granite pylon is a bas relief portrait of the honored individual and includes text about his or her contribution to the development of the “Sweet Auburn” community. Tate, a former slave, was among the five wealthiest African Americans living in Atlanta — amassing his fortune within ten years of his arrival on Auburn Avenue in the 1860s.

Brian Owens, 1996
Bas Relief
Bronze, granite
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Commemorative relief sculptures located along Auburn Avenue pay tribute to the lives and contributions of four community leaders: James Tate, Carrie Steele Logan, Alice Dugged Cary, and Wesley Chapel Redding. Each sculpture mounted on a granite pylon is a bas relief portrait of the honored individual and includes text about his or her contribution to the development of the “Sweet Auburn” community. This sculpture pays tribute to an African-American woman who started an orphanage on Auburn Avenue in the late 1800s to rescue homeless Auburn Avenue children from life on the streets.

Brian Owens, 1996
Bas Relief
Bronze, granite
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Commemorative relief sculptures located along Auburn Avenue pay tribute to the lives and contributions of four community leaders: James Tate, Carrie Steele Logan, Alice Dugged Cary, and Wesley Chapel Redding. Each sculpture mounted on a granite pylon is a bas relief portrait of the honored individual and includes text about his or her contribution to the development of the “Sweet Auburn” community. Cary was an educator and school principal who fought to open the first public library for African Americans in Atlanta, and later became its first librarian.

Robert Clements, 1994
Sculpture
Painted steel
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

A group of three vertical and three horizontal human figures made from painted steel cutouts are assembled to portray basketball players at the Rosel Fann Recreation Center. The sculptures are set on a concrete base, which is painted with more human figures.

World-renowned sculptor Peter Forakis was commissioned in 1967 to create the centerpiece for a large collection of contemporary sculptures along Fulton Industrial Boulevard. By 1981, this gigantic minimalist structure was the only sculpture remaining in the area. It underwent a restoration in 2015, and officials are working to track down some of the old sculptures that once surrounded it.

Gamba Quirino, 1969
Sculpture
Bronze, marble
Corporation for Olympic Development in Atlanta (CODA)
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Considered the symbol of Atlanta’s rebirth, “The Phoenix” — as it is popularly known — was commissioned in 1969 by the Rich Foundation to commemorate the 100th anniversary of its historic downtown department store. James Siegler, who worked in Rich’s planning department, conceived of a sculpture of a woman lifting a bird of hope to the heavens, and drew the original drawings. Ultimately designed and cast in Italy, the sculpture became associated with the Phoenix, the mystical bird of Egyptian times, who was consumed by fire and rose from the ashes. Now the unofficial symbol of Atlanta, it represents the city that ascended from the ashes and devastation of the Civil War to become an important international city.

Robert Witherspoon
Sculpture
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Robert Witherspoon’s stainless steel kinetic artwork is designed to serve as a focal point of the dramatic canopied entrance to D.H. Stanton Park and as the centerpiece of the water splashpad plaza itself. As a public art piece it speaks to the progressive vision of the Atlanta BeltLine, the architects, and most importantly the community of Peoplestown. Bearing the “fruit” of promise and optimism, the abstracted, modern tree of life sculpture is befitting to a youth-centered park that will nurture the next generation of future leaders of the Peoplestown community.

Hadley Breckinridge, 2012
Mural
Atlanta Beltline, Inc.

The Highball Artist, railroad slang for an engineer known for running the train fast, is a minimalist mural with intense color on a large scale, covering the sides and inside of the Lucile Street bridge and tunnel. The title and design imply that the speed of the train has come out through the tunnel, spilling color down one side of the bridge and exploding out of the other. The Highball Artist is an experience about movement, perspective, scale, time, space and the simple elements of color. This mural is only visible from the BeltLine Trail.

Gregor Turk, 2011
Sculpture
Atlanta BeltLine

Site X was created by four rammed earth benches that collectively form an X. The location of the installation marks the intersection of many systems — seen and unseen, above and below (e.g. power lines & sewers), natural and man-made, and vanished and soon-to-be-built.

Robin Morris and H.E.R. People, 2013
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

“Return to Nature” highlights the transformation of the old rail line to the Beltline. It depicts an abandoned steam engine transformed, as grasses and flowers inhibit the train and decorations overcome the metal structure.

JD Koth, 2013
Sculpture
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

JD Koth’s sculpture is located on the Atlanta BeltLine at the northeast corner of Piedmont Park. While dreaming, the artist entered a futuristic, ancient temple. He followed the sounds of distant singing to discover a choir of strange looking creatures with many mouths and eyes. Each of their mouths emitted a different pitch, and together they made the  most complex, layered tones he had ever heard. The intensity of their singing increased and seemed to cause geometric shapes to emanate and morph out of their foreheads.

Jac Coffey, 2012
Sculpture
Railroad parts
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

This artifact sculpture depicts three large human forms, each carrying tools and walking mid-stride in a single file line made from discarded railroad parts from the BeltLine itself. It is located just north of Greenwood Avenue alongside the granite wall.

Allen Peterson, 2013
Sculpture
Railroad spikes, shoulder plates
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Allen Peterson used railroad artifacts to create this 8-foot-tall phoenix-like form made of railroad spikes, shoulder plates, and other artifacts in order to evoke Atlanta’s history as a railroad town and its contemporary rebirth as a pedestrian-friendly city.

Maria Artemis
Sculpture
Granite
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Perkerson Park Splashpad as a focal point and a cool place for sitting on a hot Atlanta day. The stone elements are custom shaped from Elberton, Ga., granite.

David Landis, 2012
Sculpture
Stainless steel
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

David Landis’ sculpture is inspired by the Northern White Rhino, of which only four exist of breeding age on a reserve in Kenya.

Patreece Lewis, 2013
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Artist Patreece Lewis believes that while Atlanta is a tapestry of different cultures and ethnicities, everyone can agree that music is a powerful thing that can hold everyone together. It is the one thing all races and nationalities have contributed to and all appreciate. Year after year the city is bombarded with music lovers yearning to take in a show, performance, festival or concert. Thus, “The Music of Life” was created to honor Atlanta’s love of music.

Santiago Menendez, 2012
Sculpture
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

This public art project is a series of 32 steel posts that have been painted to resemble a row of giant crayons for a simple and playful display at an entrance along the Atlanta BeltLine.

Jane Garver, 2013
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

“Lines from a Conversation” is an actual geological map of the area with a legend stating the materials of each layer of earth. The legend at the end of the composition represents a conversation transcribed on site during the painting process, each line corresponding to the same color code. Jane Garver is an Atlanta-based visual artist working in sculpture, painting and public art.

Brandon Sadler, 2012
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Meaningful human relationships seem to be abandoned in favor of technological communication, pushing members of society further away from one another. Art is a healing mechanism for communities and our current economic crisis has made it imperative that we reconnect and work together for our very survival. This piece is meant to inspire unity and to be a journey of self-discovery for the public.

HENSE, 2010
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Atlanta BeltLine Eastside Trail at Virginia Ave.
Atlanta, GA 30312

Located on the Eastside Trail at Virginia Avenue, this mural is an abstract blend of lines, shapes and color, which create energetic and sophisticated compositions. These pieces are intended to give color and life to stark grey walls.

HENSE, 2010
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Located on the south side of the Ralph McGill Boulevard underpass below the Eastside Trail, this mural is an abstract blend of lines, shapes and color, which create energetic and sophisticated compositions. These pieces are intended to give color and life to stark grey walls.

Lonnie Holley, 2011
Sculpture
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

“Hands Along the Rail” pays tribute to all of the workers who worked tirelessly and without recognition to build American railways. The piece is located north of Memorial Drive between the Lofts at Reynoldstown Crossing and H. Harper Station.

HENSE and BORN, 2011
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

HENSE and longtime friend and collaborator BORN spent roughly 12 hours a day for almost two weeks on this mural and felt it was important for the work to show both of their tastes as artists. The mural is located underneath the Park Drive bridge as you enter Piedmont Park.

Joshua Sheridan and Callie Durham, 2013
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

“Facing Your Fear” is a continuous narrative full of vivid colors. The mural represents the act of facing your fears. Joshua Sheridan is an Atlanta-based painter and illustrator working primarily in watercolor and ink. Callie Durham works in water-based media on plastic surfaces, such as mylar and duralar. Her work uses animals as human surrogates to explore life’s difficult experiences.

Kyle Brooks, 2012
Murals
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Kyle Brooks’ mural features brightly colored large faces and eyes looking out from under the North Highland Avenue bridge.

Hadley Breckinridge, 2011
Mural
Atlanta Beltline, Inc.

Hadley Breckenridge is a photographer known for her sense of color. The colors in this mural reflect the time period of mass transit, 1965, attracting the attention of both pedestrians and drivers. The design involves shapes resembling intersections of interstates, roads, railroads and circles to imply unity of community reflecting the idea of connections through various forms of transportation.

David Landis, 2010
Sculpture
Stainless Steel
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

“Cycles” is a 21-foot-tall sculpture composed of swirling abstracted stainless steel Ginkgo leaves. It’s a community public art project uniting the diverse neighborhood and influenced by the designated historic tree of the area, the ginkgo tree. The work is composed of abstracted ginkgo leaves flowing in a rhythmic circle, implying motion, change, and the seasonal and generational cycles of life. David Landis was an adjunct professor at Georgia State University’s sculpture department. His work ranges from large-scale public commissions to smaller private works.

Mr. Never Satisfied, 2011
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

A mural inspired by the hard work of skaters across Atlanta’s history, referencing the locations, tricks, and feelings of the skate community in Atlanta.

Maria Artemis, 2011
Sculpture
Granite, special paving
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Maria Artemis was commissioned by Atlanta Beltline, Inc. to work with the landscape architecture and engineering firm HDR during the planning phase for the Clear Creek Storm Water Relief Project and Park.

King Pig, 2013
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

King Pig believes the theme of “Atlanta” is a concept that both locals and tourists can wrap their arms around and enjoy. The artist finds one of the themes of Atlanta and the Atlanta BeltLine to be that of historic eating establishments, thus inspiring his work “Cheeseburgers and Unicycles.”

Kyle Brooks, 2011
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

Atlanta artist Kyle Brooks’ “BeltLine Bears” are located next to Langhorn Street on the retaining wall facing the old railroad corridor. The bears are drawn from loops, just as the Atlanta BeltLine is a loop that ties Atlanta together. The bears are colorful and similar, yet unique.

Dax “Dr. Dax” Rudnak, 2011
Mural
Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.

“All Dogs Go to Heaven” is a mural that celebrates the artist’s dog, Azul, who passed away in May 2011. Dr. Dax made his name as a graffiti artist and then transitioned to fine art and photography. His art incorporates photography and his trademark color sensibility in intricate layers.

Don Haugen and Teena Stern, 1998
Sculpture
Bronze, granite, cement
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“Architect for the Future, Barbara Asher” is a figurative portrait of beloved City Council member and businesswoman, Barbara Asher, who was instrumental in bringing the Olympics to Atlanta. After passing away, this monument was constructed in her honor in Downtown Atlanta.

Enric Pladevall, 1992
Sculpture

Created the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, Spain, this sculpture was brought to Atlanta as a symbolic representation of the Games’ continuity and spirit of international unity.

John Paul Harris, 2008
Sculpture
Bronze
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Atlanta businessman and friend of Andrew Young, Charles Loudermilk funded the “Andrew Young Statue” as an homage to Young’s role in the civil rights movement and many successes as mayor of Atlanta. Though the statue is about one-and-a-half times larger than the 5-foot, 8-inch Young, he has an open and inviting pose that seems to welcome people to the city. Harris said he purposely was not put on a pedestal. “He’s a man of the people,” Harris explained. “If you want to be able to see this and relate to it, we needed him to be closer to the ground. That’s why he’s down there, so the people can be with him.” The statue commemorates the life and achievements of Young and his contributions to both the city of Atlanta and the nation.

Curtis Patterson, 2008
Sculpture
Bronze
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Then Central Atlanta Progress president, A.J. Robinson, expressed, “The vision for the Tribute plaza was to create a compelling destination that honors the contributions of one of our most important leaders. This serene park will serve as a point of reflection and inspiration along the path to Downtown’s major destinations.” Born in Shreveport, Louisiana, artist Curtis Patterson developed an appreciation for building, construction and working with his hands as the grandson of a master carpenter. Patterson’s early works generally involved painting, wood and ceramics, and his interests later shifted towards cast iron, steel and some large scale ceramic sculptures. Patterson’s works largely pay homage to the historical contributions of people of African descent.

Phil Proctor, 2009
Sculpture
Mild steel, aluminum, granite stone
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

South Bend Park
1955 Compton Dr. SE
Atlanta, GA 30315

This permanent installation (part of the Public Art Community Gateway Project) is a symbolic work that incorporates aspects that reflect the cultural values of the Lakewood Heights community. The “Community Gateway Project” represents the installation of public artworks in five distinct communities.

Ayokunle Odeleye, 1993
Sculpture
Stainless steel
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

This abstract stainless steel sculpture recalls imagery from traditional African arts. It was created by Ayokunle Odeleye, a sculptor of public pieces. He works primarily in metals and wood. Odeleye teaches art at Kennesaw State University.

Ivan Bailey, 1989
Sculpture
Forged iron
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Four sets of gates made out of iron are designed to depict a landscape related with the four Georgia Rivers. Each gate is associated with one river and is therefore, unique. Sculpted details may include plant and fish elements.

This 12-foot sculpture of Albert Einstein depicts the physicist looking at a star chart etched in granite on the ground. Einstein met artist Robert Berks in 1953 and agreed to sit for a portrait at the time. This sculpture wasn’t created until the 1970s and was originally located in New York City. It was relocated to Georgia Tech’s campus in October 2015. A larger replica of the statue is located at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C.

Bill and Mary Buchen, 2003
Sculpture
Steel, bronze, aluminum, concrete
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

Sheltered under a dome structure are nine stainless steel seats of various shapes and sizes. The seats are positioned around three metal conga drums. The artists, Bill and Mary Buchen, used steel, bronze, aluminum and concrete to make this sonic playscape. They have made a career out of building playgrounds that feature drums and other music-making elements. Their pieces serve as interactive installations that play on environmental phenomena and human activity.

Sol Lewitt, 1999
Sculpture
Concrete Block
Fulton County Public Art Program

This minimalist structure by renowned artist Sol LeWitt (1928-2007) integrates art and architecture. The work is comprised of 54 concrete pillars ranging in height from 10 to 20 feet and arranged in a triangular layout that references the urban environment and Atlanta’s skyline.

Louis Delsarte, 2002
Mural
Fulton County Arts Council

Atlanta resident Louis Delsarte, a painter and educator, has created scenes of the culture and the community of the Old Fourth Ward neighborhood during the 1940s and ’50s. This mural, titled “4th Ward,” is composed of four panels, each designed to reflect the values of community, spirituality, family and entertainment. Delsarte’s brilliant use of color and impressionist painting techniques animate these images with a vibrant energy. The first panel, “Sunday Gathering,” illustrates a scene of African-Americans in a large church listening to a soul-stirring sermon. In this panel, the artist wishes to pay homage to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and to acknowledge the importance of church life to many Old Fourth Ward residents. The second panel, “The Gathering,” pictures generations of friends and family around a table, celebrating a birthday as the cake is brought into the room. “The Family Outing” is the subject of the third panel. The artist depicts a family promenading through a residential street on a sunny afternoon, visiting with each other and their neighbors. The fourth panel, “The Dance,” pays tribute to Auburn Avenue’s night spots, such as the Royal Peacock.

Harris Dimitropoulos, 1996
Aluminum, cable, luminaries
City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

“27 Torch Gate” was constructed for the 1996 Olympics and is located on the North Avenue bridge over I-75. This installation was designed by Harris Dimitropoulos, a professor in the School of Architecture at Georgia Tech. His creative interests explore issues of representation and aesthetics. Dimitropoulos received formal architecture and art education. His architectural and art work has been exhibited in Europe and the United States.

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